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What do you imagine unions will look like in the future why

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: This Is What People Will Look Like In The Future

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A recent Forbes article described how business leaders are using new technologies, big data and analytics to do business, and yet, despite the apparent control and understanding this gives them over their environment, they are still confronted with the impacts of unpredictable economic shocks, volatility, ambiguity and complexity.

The Forbes article defines foresight as an action-oriented practice whereby one becomes more aware and engages in creating and leading their own realities. Here at the European Trade Union Institute ETUI we regard foresight as a means of research that uses various methods to help an organisation to think ahead, so that it can shape, create and develop plausible and different futures.

In short, foresight produces and uses data that organisations can then interpret to anticipate change. Foresight has been used by private companies since the first quarter of the 20th century but is increasingly used by public actors, including municipalities and states, many of whom feel the need to invent and imagine their own long-term future. For example, the city of Antwerp in Belgium is aiming to becoming a sustainable city by Through its Stadslab project, it is working together with companies, citizens and universities, and using open data to optimise digital services in government and prepare its infrastructure for technologies like blockchain.

They have developed a wide range of methods to address ongoing changes in society, the future of work and digital transition. Trade unions also operate in a fast-changing environment and are feeling the need to use foresight to shape their future. In the UK, Unions21 is exploring methods to gather trade union data, scan the environment and analyse the leverage of power and influence to improve its most relevant areas of action.

In Sweden, Futurion — the think tank of the Swedish Confederation of Professional Employees TCO — has been set up to analyse and predict the conditions for the future of work, and to spread knowledge about the Nordic labour market model.

Its mission is to develop HK digitally by inventing future jobs for its members and by developing new products and business models for the union itself. As these examples show, foresight can be used to develop the internal operational processes of trade unions and improve the services they offer to their members. It also helps unions to have a wider view and be more effective in collective bargaining at all levels.

To better explore their horizons: trade unions have the advantage of being present both on the shop floors of companies as close as one can be to actual working conditions but also in European Works Councils, on the boards of multinationals and in European Union social dialogue. This privileged position allows unions to collect data from many sources, conduct mega trend analysis and explore long-term horizons. Trade unions have access to a large variety of data sources, from observing working conditions in a specific region to experiencing how agreements are negotiated.

This gives unions a unique opportunity to identify issues that could go unnoticed to the untrained eye and, by collecting data, generate useful strategic information. To work with a long-term approach rather than short-term reactions: with foresight, trade unions can work on long-term scenarios. Thinking 30 or 40 years ahead, rather than reacting to day-to-day events, is how one can make meaningful changes.

Trade unions should define long-term priorities and enduring roadmaps, which their leaders can follow in order to achieve greater societal goals. To decide what to preserve and what to change: the world of work has changed enormously in the past 50 years. Where we once had tripartite negotiations, now there are other actors involved or, indeed, no negotiations at all. Workers of today face a barrage of new forms of non-standard or gig-work, new types of discriminatory practices, automatic profiling and algorithmic workforce management, to name just some of the issues.

Foresight is key to preserving the essence of the trade union mission, while ensuring the movement evolves to make sure that new problems and threats are tackled. There is no unique recipe to foresight. The recent ETUI publication Anticipating change, staying relevant: why should trade unions do foresight shows just how foresight can be practiced using the methods that trade unions have employed for generations.

This includes participatory approaches; involving non-current stakeholders; understanding variables like demography, climate and geopolitics; setting up early warning systems for emerging issues and evaluating all of this systematically. Whatever the chosen approach, foresight can provide invaluable help to trade unions and ensure that workers are better prepared for the unpredictable, today and every day. Equal Times is a trilingual news and opinion website focusing on labour, human rights, culture, development, the environment, politics and the economy from a social justice perspective.

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A Future Without Unions Is a Terrifying Dystopia

For far too many, the land of opportunity has turned into a land of downsized hopes and shrunken mobility. As the stories above make clear, something is fundamentally broken in the way many American employers treat their workers. Too often employers show utter contempt for the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

A recent Forbes article described how business leaders are using new technologies, big data and analytics to do business, and yet, despite the apparent control and understanding this gives them over their environment, they are still confronted with the impacts of unpredictable economic shocks, volatility, ambiguity and complexity. The Forbes article defines foresight as an action-oriented practice whereby one becomes more aware and engages in creating and leading their own realities. Here at the European Trade Union Institute ETUI we regard foresight as a means of research that uses various methods to help an organisation to think ahead, so that it can shape, create and develop plausible and different futures.

This week, the supreme court hears a case that will probably decimate American unions by going after them in the one bastion they have left, the public sector. Unions, however, are compelled by law to provide certain services to all workers in unionized workplaces, whether they are union members or not. If a majority of workers vote to unionize, they can also vote on a contract that stipulates that non-members have to pay — in lieu of dues - agency fees to cover those services they are entitled to receive. It is, of course, a little strange for libertarian types to seek the power of government to outlaw voluntary private contracts established by democratic vote, or encourage people not to pay for entitlements. In Janus, they argue that because public employees work for the government, and due to our curious legal custom of treating money as speech, such fees are constitutionally protected political speech and no one can be required to pay them.

Where Are the Workers When We Talk About the Future of Work?

Image by Lia Kantrowitz. It's mid-afternoon in late June two decades from now, and the weather in New York City is gross: hot, humid, slimy. You're trying to find your way to a job interview when you pass a child yanking on her father's arm, confused by a throng of people marching in a circle in front of them. They seem angry—there's a lot of yelling and chanting and jockeying going on—but the most confusing part, at least to the toddler's eye, is a giant inflatable rat. You know what it is, of course. Maybe your mother was a labor organizer way back when. Maybe your cousin helped unionize an online postcard startup that went bankrupt before any employees could see the benefits of a contract. But the child's father, perhaps 35 years old and gainfully employed at an Amazon subsidiary, doesn't know or doesn't care. He shrugs and pulls the kid down a side street to avoid the hubbub. Many Americans today would recognize what was going on back there as a picket line.

The future of American unions hangs in the balance

Innovative applications of AI in hotel and restaurant settings may threaten jobs in these sectors. The McKinsey Global Institute forecasts that automation will, by , destroy more than 39 million jobs in the United States, while two Oxford professors estimate that 47 percent of U. By contrast, there are plenty of seats for billionaire investors, millionaire executives, as well as consultants and technology gurus. It often seems that the corporate executives rushing to introduce artificial intelligence, robots, and other new technologies plan to give workers as much say in these matters as zoo managers give to the animals about revamping a zoo.

Report Unions and Labor Standards.

For the better part of four decades, workers have been more productive than ever, creating massive amounts of wealth—but rigged economic rules, unmitigated corporate greed and unrelenting political attacks have weakened our voices, stifled our wages and eroded our economic security. Yet as we write this report, a wave of collective action is sweeping the nation. Working people across industries and demographics are joining together for a better life.

On the face of it you might think that the future is full of potential for trade unions. Public concerns over low pay have soared to record levels over recent years. Yet none of these currents are likely to reverse a pattern of long-term decline. Membership peaked at over 13 million in and has fallen to 6.

But we do know one thing for sure: The decisions policymakers make today will determine who controls that future and whether working people will thrive or struggle just to survive. Working with Gov. Gavin Newsom and legislators, I look forward to putting my years of experience in the labor movement fighting for the economic and workplace rights of Californians to work on helping to form policies that will build a sustainable future for decades to come. The goal: to deliver good jobs, fair wages and health care and retirement for all, regardless of how rapidly technological advances transform the workplace. In fact, we have a critical role to play in the future.

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Oct 22, - Greenhouse Future of funsizederin.com It would be great if the federal government helped ensure that workers have a voice in Labor unions are also somewhat at fault for workers having so little say in these discussions. I imagine that millions of workers will have very strong opinions about these.

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